Items designed or engraved by Daniel Carr and minted by (or for) others.
Printable Catalog with Mintage Statistics for Items Designed and Minted by Daniel Carr / Moonlight Mint.

 

For unauthorized issues, see Alert regarding fakes of Daniel Carr coins.

 

 

 

US Mint New York and Rhode Island state quarters, 2001.

In November, 1999 I received an invitation from the mint to participate in a design competition for the five 2001 state quarters. Apparently, the Mint's production timetable was running short so they stepped in to help the states get things moving with the design selection process. The Mint started by asking the Governors of each of the five states for a list of three to five themes that they would like to see on the coin. Then the Mint invited approximately 30 artists to submit designs based upon the suggested themes. Due to the Mint's timetable, a business trip, and surgery, I had only one weekend to produce all five designs. My New York and Rhode Island designs were chosen for the actual coins, and I was paid by the US Mint for the designs. Note, however, that the US Mint did not acknowledge the design origin, and the initials on the coins are those of the US Mint sculptor who sculpted it, not the designer (standard practice for state quarters).


2001 US Mint New York state quarter.

 

One suggested design theme from the state of New York was the Stature of Liberty, with a state outline and the legend “Gateway to Freedom”. The Erie canal outline was added later, after the initial design had been prepared. So basically, all I did was arrange the furniture that New York had already picked out. Engraved by Al Maletsky.

 

Final Mintages:

 

Philadelphia (“P” mint) copper-nickel clad: 655,400,000

Denver (“D” mint) copper-nickel clad: 619,640,000

San Francisco (“S” mint) copper-nickel clad PROOF: 3,094,140

San Francisco (“S” mint) 90% Silver PROOF: 889,697

2001 US Mint Rhode Island state quarter.

 

Rhode Island’s suggested theme was simply a ship or ships. That left a lot of artistic leeway. My initial design was well-received, but there was a request to show a different ship than the generic sailboat I originally had. My final design shows the “Reliance”, which was built in Rhode Island and won the America’s Cup races in 1903. Newport Bridge across Narragansett Bay is shown in the background. Engraved by Thomas D Rodgers.

 

Final Mintages:

 

Philadelphia (“P” mint) copper-nickel clad: 423,000,000

Denver (“D” mint) copper-nickel clad: 447,100,000

San Francisco (“S” mint) copper-nickel clad PROOF: 3,094,140

San Francisco (“S” mint) 90% Silver PROOF: 889,697

 

 

US Mint Maine state quarter, 2003.

The Maine Arts Commission held a design competition for the Maine state quarter in May, 2001. The contest was open to full- and part-time Maine residents. I am not a Maine resident, but a friend and coworker of mine, Jim Pendleton, is from Maine. His parents, Leland and Carolyn Pendleton, have lived in Rockland for 40 years. The Pendletons provided me with suggestions and historical background, in addition to submitting the design I created.


IDL TIFF file

2003 Maine state quarter design, as chosen by the State.

 

This final revision that I submitted was chosen by the state of Maine as the design they wanted for their quarter.
It shows the Pemaquid Point Light, with the three-mast schooner “Victory Chimes” (a designated national historic landmark) passing in the distance.

 

In 2005 I minted concept patterns of this design (see Alternate State Quarters).

2003 US Mint Maine state quarter.

 

Starting in 2003, the US Mint had a new policy for state quarter design submissions from the states – they would only accept narratives, not graphics. As such, they would not accept my Maine design, even though the state of Maine wanted it. So the US mint generated their own design, based on my theme.

 

Final Mintages (by US Mint):

 

Philadelphia (“P” mint) copper-nickel clad: 217,400,000

Denver (“D” mint) copper-nickel clad: 231,400,000

San Francisco (“S” mint) copper-nickel clad PROOF: 3,408,516

San Francisco (“S” mint) 90% Silver PROOF: 1,125,755

 

 


Reno Coin Club Medal, 2004.

In 2003 I submitted a design for the Nevada State Quarter to the Governor’s office in Carson City. As an unsolicited submission, I retained the copyright on it. In 2012 I discovered that years earlier someone had taken this design (without permission and without contacting me), and they used it for one side of the 2004 Reno Coin Club’s 20th anniversary medal. The medal was sculpted, engraved, and minted by Silvertowne Mint. I contacted them, but they could not determine where they got the design. I reached a settlement with them, and I obtained the dies in 2013 and struck some additional examples (with the club’s permission).


2004 Reno Coin Club medal. Obverse Nevada state quarter design By Daniel Carr (“DC” initials below coin icon). Reverse design by the Club (logo).

 


Original 2004 mintage specifics are not entirely known. Approximately 100 were made in silver, and 400 total in various base metals (brass, copper, zinc, nickel). A couple years later, one was reportedly made in gold. All reportedly had a proof-like finish and were 39mm in diameter (silver and gold issues were one troy oz., .999 fine).

 

2013 mintage by Moonlight Mint:

 

Pewter, matte: 1

Pewter, proof-like: 4

 

Nickel, matte: 1

Nickel, proof-like: 4

 

Brass, matte: 2

Brass, satin: 11

Brass, proof-like: 5

 

Copper, matte: 2

Copper, satin: 11

Copper, proof-like: 5

 

Silver, matte: 2 (one multi-struck)

Silver, satin: 8

Silver, proof-like: 4

 

All are 39mm, medal-turn orientation, smooth edge.

Silver issues are marked on the edge “ONE TROY OZ . 999 SILVER”.
The dies were re-polished prior to the 2013 mintage.

 

2013 re-strike in silver proof-like, shown at left.

 

The triangular space between the locomotive smoke stack and the west border of the state outline is frosted on the original strikes. The proof-like re-strikes have this area polished (as originally intended for this design).

 

 


Washington DC and Puerto Rico novelty quarters, 2004-2009.

In 2004 I was contracted by National Collectors Mint (NCM), a coin marketing company, to design novelty Washington DC and Puerto Rico quarters. They were minted with dates ranging from 2004-2009, in silver-plated and solid silver versions (the 2005 Puerto Rico solid silver version is unconfirmed). The solid silver versions are marked on the edge. The US Mint’s Puerto Rico quarter, designed a few years after mine, has some obvious similarities.

Washington DC obverse, 2004-2008

Date below Capitol,
“JUSTICE TO ALL”.

Washington DC obverse, 2009 only.

Date to right of Washington Monument,
“NO TAXATION WITHOUT REPRESENTATION”.

Puerto Rico obverse, 2004-2009.

Common reverse, 2004 only.

Same as regular US Mint State Quarter, except “COPY” on head.

Common reverse, 2005-2009.

“50 UNITED STATES * ONE NATION”,

“51st STATE PROOF”,

“COPY” on head.

Silver-plated issues,

fully-reeded edge,

6.5 grams (typical).

Pure (solid) silver issues,

partially-reeded edge with “.999 FINE SILVER”,

7.9 grams (typical).

 

 


Freedom Tower Silver Dollar, 2004-2009.

In 2004 I was contracted by National Collectors Mint (NCM), a coin marketing company, to design a "Freedom Tower Silver Dollar". After submitting the basic artwork, NCM began their marketing campaign. I disagreed with their tactics and I suspended my relationship with them. Shortly after that, New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer banned sales of the coins and imposed a fine on NCM. Four major issues were involved.

1) The general perception was that NCM was attempting to "cash-in" on the tragedy. In reality, the original coin was intended to commemorate ground-breaking for the new "Freedom Tower" building at the site of the twin towers. But that still didn't make it right.

2) The marketing for the coins was misleading and caused people to believe that the coins were pure (solid) silver when, if fact, most (but not all) were only silver plated.

3) NCM claimed that the coins were "created with" silver recovered from the World Trade Center (WTC) disaster site. Technically, this was true. However, all they had to do was melt one WTC recovery Silver Eagle in a larger batch of silver and use that silver for the coins.

4) NCM claimed that the coins were "Government Issue" legal-tender silver dollars. The fine print stated that the coins were legal tender of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI). CNMI, however, is a protectorate of the United States and has no legal authority to issue their own money.

Publicly, issues #1 and #2 were the most widely discussed. But issue #4 was the main factor in the decision by the government to ban the coins.

After the initial ban, NCM changed their marketing tactics, taking a more low-key approach. They skirted the ban by associating the coins with the Cook Islands rather than the CNMI. The Cook Islands issues are technically legal tender.

Shortly after suspending my relationship with NCM, I also learned that the president of NCM had, in the past, been fined for marketing pornography via the US Mail. In an ironic twist to the story, Elliot Spitzer was subsequently forced to resign over a prostitution scandal.

The Wikipedia article contains information about the history and controversies surrounding these coins.

Shown below are images of the different coins issued by NCM. I created the original basic designs (note "DC" designer's initials at lower right). Legends were changed and other modifications (such as the addition of extra buildings in 2007) were made to the designs outside of my control. Sunshine Minting did the actual sculpting/engraving and striking.

These items have a collector following, in spite of (or perhaps as a result of) their controversial nature. Most collectors are aware only of the silver plated issues. I created this reference page to document the different varieties that were produced.

2004

.



2004 $1 - Type 1 (small Statue of Liberty, "In God We Trust").
Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands issue.

Bronze core with "100 mil" silver plating ("clad").

Unknown quantity of World Trade Center recovery silver used in the plating process.

This is the issue that most collectors are familiar with. It was heavily marketed for a short period and then gained additional notoriety when sales of it were banned.

38mm diameter. Smooth edge marked "COMMONWEALTH N. MARIANA ISLANDS - WORLD TRADE CENTER RECOVERY SILVER - 100 MIL. CLAD".

Early-issue Certificate of Authenticity showing facsimile signatures of Barry Goldwater Jr. and Daniel Carr.

Later-issue Certificate of Authenticity showing facsimile signature of Barry Goldwater Jr. only. When I suspended my relationship with NCM, I requested that they no longer use my name or signature. So NCM removed my signature from the COA.

.

.

Same front/back design as 2004 clad issue.


2004 $1 - Type 1 (small Statue of Liberty, "In God We Trust").
Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands issue.

Pure 999 silver core, possibly with "100 mil" silver plating. One troy ounce 999 silver total weight.

Unknown quantity of World Trade Center recovery silver used.

This issue is very scarce. It was not widely marketed like the clad $1 issue, and the issue price (for those who knew to ask about it) was significantly higher. Like the 2004 clad $1, it was only available for a short time before sales were banned.

38mm diameter. Smooth edge marked "COMMONWEALTH N. MARIANA ISLANDS - WORLD TRADE CENTER RECOVERY SILVER - 1 OZ .999 FINE".

Certificate of Authenticity showing facsimile signature of Barry Goldwater Jr. only, along with specifications indicating the pure silver (one troy ounce) content.

.

.



2004 $50 - Type 1 (small Statue of Liberty, "In God We Trust").
Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands issue.

Pure 9999 gold, One quarter troy ounce 9999 gold total weight.

Unknown quantity of World Trade Center recovery gold used.

This issue is very rare (announced mintage limit 3,500). It was not widely marketed like the clad $1 issue, and the issue price (for those who knew to ask about it) was considerably higher, of course. Sales of this coin apparently were halted when sales of the 2004 $1 coins were banned.

19mm diameter. Smooth edge marked "COMMONWEALTH N. MARIANA ISLANDS .25 OZ 9999 GOLD".

Certificate of Authenticity showing facsimile signatures of Barry Goldwater Jr. and Daniel Carr, along with specifications indicating the pure gold (1/4 troy ounce) content.

.

.



2004 $25 - Type 2 (large Statue of Liberty, "In God We Trust").
Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands issue.

Pure 9999 gold, One quarter troy ounce 9999 gold total weight.

Unknown quantity of World Trade Center recovery gold used.

This issue is rare (announced mintage limit 3,500). It was not widely marketed like the clad $1 issue, and the issue price (for those who knew to ask about it) was considerably higher, of course. Sales of this coin apparently were halted when sales of the 2004 $1 coins were banned.

19mm diameter. Smooth edge marked "COMMONWEALTH N. MARIANA ISLANDS .25 OZ 9999 GOLD".

Certificate of Authenticity showing facsimile signature of Barry Goldwater Jr. only, along with specifications indicating the pure gold (1/4 troy ounce) content.

2005

.



2005 $1 - Type 3 (large Statue of Liberty, "Let Freedom Ring").
Cook Islands issue.

Bronze core with "100 mil" silver plating ("clad").

Unknown quantity of World Trade Center recovery silver used in the plating process.

This issue is also known to many collectors. It is designated as non-circulating legal-tender of the Cook Islands. But since the Cook Islands issue their own independent currency (unlike the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands which legally must use only US Dollars), this issue was not banned by the US government.

38mm diameter. Smooth edge (no edge marking).

Certificate of Authenticity showing facsimile signature of Barry Goldwater Jr. only.

.

.

Same front/back design as 2005 clad issue.


2005 $1 - Type 3 (large Statue of Liberty, "Let Freedom Ring").
Cook Islands issue.
Pure 999 silver core, possibly with "100 mil" silver plating. One troy ounce 999 silver total weight.

Unknown quantity of World Trade Center recovery silver used.

This issue is somewhat scarce. It was not widely marketed like the clad $1 issue, and the issue price (for those who knew to ask about it) was significantly higher.

38mm diameter. Partially-reeded edge marked "1 TROY OZ. .999 FINE SILVER".

Certificate of Authenticity showing facsimile signature of Barry Goldwater Jr. only, along with specifications indicating the pure silver (one troy ounce) content.

2006

.

Same front/back/edge design as 2005 clad issue,
except with "2006" date.

2006 $1 - Type 3 (large Statue of Liberty, "Let Freedom Ring").
Cook Islands issue.

Bronze core with "100 mil" silver plating ("clad").

Unknown quantity of World Trade Center recovery silver used in the plating process.

This issue is also known to many collectors. It is designated as non-circulating legal-tender of the Cook Islands. But since the Cook Islands issue their own independent currency (unlike the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands which legally must use only US Dollars), this issue was not banned by the US government.

38mm diameter. Smooth edge (no edge marking).

Certificate of Authenticity showing facsimile signature of Barry Goldwater Jr. only.

.

.

Same front/back/edge design as 2005 solid silver issue,
except with "2006" date.

2006 $1 - Type 3 (large Statue of Liberty, "Let Freedom Ring").
Cook Islands issue.

Pure 999 silver core, possibly with "100 mil" silver plating. One troy ounce 999 silver total weight.

Unknown quantity of World Trade Center recovery silver used.

This issue is somewhat scarce. It was not widely marketed like the clad $1 issue, and the issue price (for those who knew to ask about it) was significantly higher.

38mm diameter. Partially-reeded edge marked "1 TROY OZ. .999 FINE SILVER".

Certificate of Authenticity showing facsimile signature of Barry Goldwater Jr. only, along with specifications indicating the pure silver (one troy ounce) content.

2007, 2008, 2010

.



2007, 2008, 2010 $1 - Type 4 (large Statue of Liberty, extra buildings).
Cook Islands issue.

Bronze core with "100 mil" silver plating ("clad").

Unknown quantity of World Trade Center recovery silver used in the plating process.

This issue is also known to many collectors. It is designated as non-circulating legal-tender of the Cook Islands. But since the Cook Islands issue their own independent currency (unlike the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands which legally must use only US Dollars), this issue was not banned by the US government.

38mm diameter. Smooth edge (no edge marking).

Certificate of Authenticity showing facsimile signature of Barry Goldwater Jr. only.

.

.

Same front/back design as 2007-2008 clad issue.


2007, 2008 (2010 unconfirmed)  $1 - Type 4 (large Statue of Liberty, extra buildings).
Cook Islands issue.

Pure 999 silver core, possibly with "100 mil" silver plating. One troy ounce 999 silver total weight.

Unknown quantity of World Trade Center recovery silver used.

This issue is somewhat scarce. It was not widely marketed like the clad $1 issue, and the issue price (for those who knew to ask about it) was significantly higher.

38mm diameter. Partially-reeded edge marked "1 TROY OZ. .999 FINE SILVER".

Certificate of Authenticity showing facsimile signature of Barry Goldwater Jr. only, along with specifications indicating the pure silver (one troy ounce) content.

2009

.


Other side same as 2007-2008 issue.
Plain smooth edge.

2009 $1 - Type 5 (Re-engraved, large Statue of Liberty, extra buildings, ray passes above "O" in "ONE", larger letters in "FREEDOM TOWER").
Cook Islands issue.

Bronze core with "100 mil" silver plating ("clad").

Unknown quantity of World Trade Center recovery silver used in the plating process.

This issue is also known to many collectors. It is designated as non-circulating legal-tender of the Cook Islands. But since the Cook Islands issue their own independent currency (unlike the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands which legally must use only US Dollars), this issue was not banned by the US government.

38mm diameter. Smooth edge (no edge marking).

Same certificate as 2007-2008 clad issue, but with a "2009" date.

Certificate of Authenticity showing facsimile signature of Barry Goldwater Jr. only.

.

.

Same front/back design as 2009 clad issue.

2009 $1 - Type 5 (Re-engraved, large Statue of Liberty, extra buildings, ray passes above "O" in "ONE", larger letters in "FREEDOM TOWER").
Cook Islands issue.

Pure 999 silver core, possibly with "100 mil" silver plating. One troy ounce 999 silver total weight.

Unknown quantity of World Trade Center recovery silver used.

This issue is somewhat scarce. It was not widely marketed like the clad $1 issue, and the issue price (for those who knew to ask about it) was significantly higher.

38mm diameter. Partially-reeded edge marked ".999 F.S." (999 Fine Silver).

Same certificate as 2007-2008 solid silver issue, but with a "2009" date.

Certificate of Authenticity showing facsimile signature of Barry Goldwater Jr. only, along with specifications indicating the pure silver (one troy ounce) content.

PACKAGING

.

Single $1 packaging - capsule and case.

Double $1 set packaging - capsules and case.

Single $50/$25 packaging - capsule with white foam rubber gasket and case.

 

 

International Association of Silver Art Collectors (IASAC) annual medal, 2006.

In 2006, the IASAC (International Association of Silver Art Collectors) conducted a design contest for their annual silver medal. The designs are typically related to the host city of the annual IASAC convention, which was Tucson Arizona for 2006. I entered the design below and it was chosen as the winning design for the obverse.


 

2006 IASAC medal.

 

The silver version had my Gila Monster obverse, with the IASAC logo reverse. The brass version had my Gila Monster obverse, with a generic (mostly blank) reverse for engraving.

 

Mintages:

Brass, antiqued finish (generic mostly-blank reverse for engraving): 120.
Silver (one troy oz 999), proof-like finish (IASAC logo reverse with individual serial number): 120.
Silver (one troy oz 999), proof-like finish with color enamel (IASAC logo reverse with individual serial number): 40.

 

 

Token and Medal Society (TAMS) annual medal, 2006.

In 2006, TAMS conducted a design contest for their annual medal. The designs are sometimes related to the host city of the annual TAMS meeting, which was Denver Colorado for 2006 (as part of the summer ANA convention held in Denver that year). I had already produced a Denver Mint Centennial medal for 2006, and the obverse design for that was modified and chosen as the obverse for the TAMS medal as well.


2006 TAMS medal.

 

The obverse features a portion of the exterior of the original Denver Mint building. The reverse is the TAMS logo.

 

The obverse die was made by another party via a transfer process from my original hard acrylic 8-inch diameter model. During the transfer process, there must have been some slippage. The TAMS obverse die shows some rotational warping in the central areas of the design.

For more production details, see 2006-D Denver Mint Centennial Tokens.

 

Scottsdale Silver Round, circa 2009.

Circa 2009 Scottsdale Silver Round.

 

Obverse: Scottsdale Silver logo.

Reverse: “SS” on cross.

 

Lion logo design by Scottsdale Silver. Remaining design elements by Daniel Carr.

 

Unknown quantity struck. Multiple die varieties.

Only the first die pair was engraved by Daniel Carr.

Earlier issues show small Registered Trademark symbol (“R” in circle) at lower right of Lion head.

These come with reeded-edge or smooth-edge. Most are weakly-struck in center.

Later issues are struck better in the center and many lack the Registered Trademark symbol.

These apparently come only with smooth edge.

 

Prospector Fractional Gold/Silver/Platinum/Palladium, 2014-2016.

IDL TIFF file

 

 

2014 Prospector bullion.

 

Obverse: Prospector, taken from the 1925 California Gold Rush commemorative half dollar (mirrored).

Reverse: Eagle Head.

 

All of the 2014 39mm 1-oz silver, and some of the 2014 16.5mm pieces were struck by Daniel Carr at Moonlight Mint. Most of the 16.5mm pieces were struck by Dave Emslie using dies engraved by Daniel Carr. For mintages and additional information on these, see the 2014 Prospector section here:

http://www.moonlightmint.com/dc-coin_gold_list.htm .

 

 

2015-2016 Prospector bullion.

All 2015-2016 pieces were struck by Dave Emslie using dies engraved by Daniel Carr.

 

 

2015 Mintages (all smooth edge, surface finish varies):

 

16.5mm gold 1/10 troy oz:

16.5mm silver 1/20 troy oz:

16.5mm platinum 1/10 troy oz:

16.5mm palladium 1/20 troy oz:

 

 

2016 Mintages (all smooth edge, surface finish varies):

 

16.5mm gold 1/10 troy oz:

16.5mm silver 1/20 troy oz:

16.5mm platinum 1/10 troy oz:

16.5mm palladium 1/20 troy oz:

 

Endeavor Metals Group (EMG), Gold, 70th D-Day, 2014.


Endeavor Metals Group (EMG) Gold, 70th D-Day, 2014, Type 1.

 

Obverse: General Eisenhower with “EMG” vertically along the rim at 3:00.

Reverse: Airborne invasion and Normandy coast.

 

1/10-troy-oz .9999 gold.

 

One test piece was struck at Moonlight Mint (it was struck in a collar that was a little too big for the die diameter and it has somewhat lopsided rims). All others were struck at another mint, using dies engraved by Daniel Carr.


Endeavor Metals Group (EMG) Gold, 70th D-Day, 2014, Type 2.

 

Obverse: General Eisenhower with small “RM” and “DC” horizontally near the rim at 3:00.

Reverse: Airborne invasion and Normandy coast.

 

Struck in 1/10-troy-oz, ¼-troy-oz, and ½-troy-oz sizes, at another mint, using dies engraved by Daniel Carr.

 

Endeavor Metals Group (EMG), Platinum, JFK / Apollo 11 Moon Landing, 2014.

IDL TIFF file

IDL TIFF file

Endeavor Metals Group (EMG), Platinum, JFK / Apollo 11 Moon Landing, 2014.

 

Obverse: John F. Kennedy.

Reverse: Lunar Lander with Astronaut and Earth in the distance.

 

Designed and struck at another mint in 1/10-troy-oz, ¼-troy-oz, and ½-troy-oz sizes, using dies sculpted and engraved by Daniel Carr.

 

 

Endeavor Metals Group (EMG), Gold, Woodrow Wilson / WW1 Centennial, 2014.

Endeavor Metals Group (EMG), Gold, Woodrow Wilson / WW1 Centennial, 2014.

 

Obverse: Woodrow Wilson.

Reverse: WW1 ships and planes.

 

Designed and struck at another mint in 1/10-troy-oz, ¼-troy-oz, and ½-troy-oz sizes, using dies sculpted and engraved by Daniel Carr.

 

 

Tangible Metals, Platinum, FDR / Pearl Harbor, 2014.

Tangible Metals, Platinum, FDR / Pearl Harbor, 2014.

 

Obverse: Franklin D. Roosevelt portrait, taken from the dime design by John Sinnock.

Reverse: Airborne attack on Pearl Harbor with USS Maryland.

 

Struck in 1/10-troy-oz and ¼-troy-oz sizes, at another mint, using dies engraved by Daniel Carr.

 

 

Worth Preservation, Gold & Silver, Liberty Head / Eagle, 2016.


Worth Preservation, Gold & Silver, Liberty Head / Eagle, 2016.

 

Obverse: Liberty Head design by James B Longacre, modified by Daniel Carr.

Reverse: Eagle design by James B Longacre, modified by Daniel Carr.

 

Struck in 1/10-troy-oz gold and ½-troy-oz silver sizes, at another mint, using dies engraved by Daniel Carr.

 

 

Fair Trade Silver rounds.


2014 “Double Eagle” Fair Trade Silver Round.

 

Obverse: Fair Trade Silver logo.

Reverse: “Double Eagle” with pistols.

 

Proof-like finish.

 

Three test pieces struck at Moonlight Mint (all with a fully-reeded edge).

The rest were struck at another mint using the dies engraved by Daniel Carr.
These have a partially-reeded edge with a 4-digit serial number ranging from 0001 to 2500.
2,500 reportedly struck. Issued in capsules with certificates and boxes.


2014 “Double Eagle” Fair Trade Silver Round.

 

Obverse: Fair Trade Silver logo.

Reverse: “Double Eagle” with pistols.

 

Satin finish.

 

Struck at another mint using dies engraved by Daniel Carr.
Fully-reeded edge with no serial numbers.

 

Some were also struck in nickel and were marked as such.

 

 

ANA “Kennedy Nickel”, 2014.



 

 

2014 ANA Kennedy Nickel.

 

Obverse: Reduced-size Kennedy portrait from 1964 half dollar.

Reverse: ANA National Coin Week.

 

Six uniface (smooth edge) test pieces were broad-struck at Moonlight Mint, four on US Mint nickel 5-cent blanks and two centered on 34mm copper blanks.

A larger quantity (mostly in pewter) was struck at ANA headquarters using the Kennedy obverse die engraved by Daniel Carr, paired with an ANA reverse die by Joe Paonessa.

 

The ANA pieces have an edge marked “MADE AT THE MONEY MUSEUM  COLORADO SPRINGS, CO.”

 

 

2015-2016 LPL Financial award medal.




 

 

2015 LPL Financial award medal.

 

Obverse: Eagle.

Reverse: blank.

 

Struck on 76mm silver-plated bronze blanks.

 

Test strikes with “2014” date: 2 minted.

Regular production with “2015” date: 800 minted.

Regular production with “2016” date: 800 minted.

 

 

2015-2016 “Birther” round.


IDL TIFF fileIDL TIFF file

 

2015-2016 “Birther” round.

 

Obverse: St Gaudens Liberty design with modifications by Daniel Carr. Dated “2015” or “2016”.

Reverse: Wreath and text. Revised for 2016 issue (2015 version shown).

 

2015-dated test strikes centered on 63mm pewter blanks: 5 minted.

2015-dated regular strikes on 50mm 999 silver blanks (2 troy oz): 345 minted.

2016-dated regular strikes on 50mm 999 silver blanks (2 troy oz): 250 minted.

 

 

Michigan state quarter concept, 2016. Props used in the movie “Coin Heist” (released 06 January 2017 on Netflix).

IDL TIFF file
IDL TIFF file

Michigan state quarter concept, 2016.

 

Obverse (Type 1 and Type 2): Washington state quarter design based on original by John Flanagan.

Reverse: Michigan fishing scene (two varieties).

 

Type-1: George Washington obverse, reverse with 1 fin on back of fish. Engraved and struck by Daniel Carr.

Type-2: George Washington obverse, reverse with 2 fins on back of fish. Engraved and struck by Daniel Carr.

Type-3: Obverse with 1 fin on back of fish. Reverse with 2 fins on back of fish. Not engraved or struck by Daniel Carr.

 

Type-1, over-struck on US Mint copper-nickel clad Washington quarters (1973-2016 vintage, statehood, possessions, national parks, regular, Bicentennial): 39 minted (coin-flip orientation).

Type-1, over-struck on US Mint 90% silver Washington quarters (1936-1964 vintage): 5 minted (two medal-turn orientation, three coin-flip orientation, one was widely broad-struck).

Type-2, over-struck on US Mint copper-nickel clad Washington quarters (1973-2007 vintage, statehood, regular, Bicentennial): 83 minted (coin-flip orientation, one was broad-struck).

Type-2, over-struck on US Mint 90% silver Washington quarters (1940-1964 vintage): 47 minted (most have medal-turn orientation, one was double-struck, two were Variety 2 struck over Variety 1).

 

Type-3, struck on blanks that are: 58.5% copper; 20.5% nickel; 20.5% zinc : about 200 minted (medal-turn orientation).

 

All Type-1 and Type-2 were over-struck in a cracked collar with a small edge protrusion near the “GA” of MICHIGAN.

 

The coins (Type-2 and Type-3), and the dies that struck them (Type-1 and Type-2), were featured in the movie.

The basic design sketch was supplied by the movie’s producer.

 

The ending credits in the movie list a “Special Thanks” to Daniel Carr (among others).

 

 

2016 Colorado Masonic Medal.


2016 Colorado Masonic Medal.

Distributed by Colorado Springs Masonic Lodge.

 

Obverse: Pike’s Peak above wheat field with Masonic logo. Design by Daniel Carr.

Reverse: Masonic crest. Design by London Masons and Scot Autry.

 

39mm brass, smooth edge, brilliant satin:

8 minted.

 

39mm brass, smooth edge, antiqued:

4 minted.

 

39mm copper, smooth edge, brilliant satin:

503 minted.

 

39mm silver, gold plate on Masonic logo, smooth edge (marked “ONE TROY OZ . 999 SILVER”), brilliant satin:

200 minted.

 

50 grams GOLD, smooth edge (marked “50 GRAMS 999+ GOLD”), brilliant satin:

10 minted.